What Non-Profits can do to Empower Veterans to effect real change for Veterans – Part 1

by Terry Richards

What Non-Profits can do to Empower homeless, transitioning, disabled, elderly Veterans who have no income or poverty-level income?

WHAT DOES NOT EMPOWER VETERANS

First, in general, here are some things that Veterans Organizations, Veterans Charities, and other Non-Profits do that DO NOT EMPOWER and effect real life change for Homeless Veterans, Veterans in Transitional Housing Programs, or Veterans who have permanent housing but have poverty-level income.

*Barbeques, Dinners (Except on Veterans Day or for Elderly Veterans Events)                                                                                                   *Dinners (Except on Thanksgiving, Christmas Day or for Elderly Veterans Events)                                                                                        *Low-quality second-hand clothing,                                                    *Sanitary kits,                                                                                              *Sleeping bags,                                                                                         *Backpacks

WHAT DOES EMPOWER VETERANS

*Jobs – working for your Nonprofit full or part-time in place of hiring non-Veterans for administrative, clerical, consulting, transportation Jobs, etc., needed for your Nonprofit. 

If the Nonprofit makes the hiring of these categories of Veterans as part of its Mission Statement then the money it spends from its Private Donations and/or Government Funding it receives, it is not counted as *“Overhead Expenses”, and therefore, the Non-Profit can show and declare on their IRS Form 990 or other Government Nonprofit required annual statements a substantially higher amount of total spending on its “Program Expenses” which renowned Philanthropic Organizations say should be at least 60%.

*Overhead includes a nonprofit’s administrative expenses, which are not directly related to the organization’s programs or services. A nonprofit’s overhead includes the cost of personnel in accounting, management and human resources departments. Also included are fundraising expenses, including salaries, professional consultant and special events. The cost of information management technology is part of overhead. All supplies and materials in these administrative areas also count as overhead.

TO BE CONTINUED IN PART 2

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